ABOUT RUST COLLEGE

> Accreditation
> Admissions Booklet
> Campus Map
> Fact Sheet
> General Institutional Goals
> Historical Background
> Location
> Mission Statement
> Philosophy and Purpose
> Presidents of Rust College
> Quality Enhancement Plans (QEP) Goals
> Significant Dates
> The Campus and the Buildings


ACCREDITATION

Rust College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools - Commission on Colleges to award Associate and Baccalaureate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Rust College.

GENERAL INSTITUTIONAL GOALS 2009 – 2014
(Reference: 2009-2014 Strategic Plan)

1. To operate programs and activities that are firmly based in the institutional mission.
2. To utilize an institutional model for monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of college operations as
they relate to its mission.
3. To strengthen the college's academic program in teaching, research and community service.
4. To institutionalize an enrollment management system aimed at the recruitment, retention and graduation of
top quality students (Quality Enhancement Plan).
5. To stabilize enrollment at 1,000 FTE students.
6. To improve the system for acquiring and managing the college's fiscal resources to include a projected
increase in permanent endowment to $30 million.
7. To advance the college's technologies to include a wireless campus in order to meet the challenges of all
academic and administrative areas.

Students with varied academic achievement, cultural backgrounds and socioeconomic status attend Rust College. The college has, therefore, the responsibility to provide educational experiences which will provide challenges for the gifted and will also offer adequate opportunities for the under-achiever to make up his or her academic deficiencies and to benefit from a college education.

Traditionally a liberal arts institution, Rust College provides programs for students to prepare for professional and graduate study, for community service, and for employment in various fields. The total environment and educational programs have been geared to provide orientation for community service, leadership and human relations.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
RUST COLLEGE was established in 1866 by the Freedman's Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Its founders were missionaries from the North who opened a school in Asbury Methodist Episcopal Church, accepting adults of all ages, as well as children, for instruction in elementary subjects. A year later the first building on the present campus was erected.

In 1870, the school was chartered as Shaw University, honoring the Reverend S.O. Shaw, who made a gift of $10,000 to the new institution. In 1892, the name was changed to Rust University to avoid confusion with another Shaw University. The name was a tribute to Richard S. Rust of Cincinnati, Ohio, Secretary of the Freedman's Aid Society. In 1915, the title was changed to the more realistic name, Rust College.

As students progressed, high school and college courses were added to the curriculum, and in 1878 two students were graduated from the college department. As public schools for Negroes became more widespread the need for private schools decreased, and in 1930 the grade school was discontinued. The high school continued to function until 1953.

A significant change in the administration of the institution took place in 1920 when Dr. M.S. Davage became president, the first Negro to hold that position. Dr. L. M. McCoy (1924), his successor, was the first alumnus to serve his Alma Mater as president. He was followed in 1957 by Dr. Earnest A. Smith, an alumnus, class of 1937. In 1967, Dr. William A. McMillan, a non-alumnus assumed the presidency. In 1993, Dr. David L. Beckley, an alumnus, class of 1967, became the eleventh president of Rust College.

Among approximately 20,000 former students of Rust College, many completed only their elementary or secondary education. However, more than 5,500 have graduated from the college department. Among these alumni are bishops of the United Methodist Church and other Church denominations, public school teachers and administrators, college presidents, lawyers, physicians, businessmen, government leaders and ministers.

LOCATION
The College is located in the city of Holly Springs in the Northwestern part of Mississippi. Situated approximately 35 miles southeast of Memphis, Tennessee, the College is on U.S. Highway 178 and Mississippi Highway 7.

MISSION STATEMENT

Rust College is a historically Black, coeducational, senior liberal arts college founded in 1866 by the Freedman's Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The College is related to the United Methodist Church, and dedicated to serving students with a variety of academic preparations, through instruction in the humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural science, business, technology, and education. The College recognizes the threefold functions of education as being teaching, research, and community service. Its primary mission, however, is teaching. It offers a well-rounded program designed to acquaint students with cultural, moral, and spiritual values, both in theory and in practice. Rust College provides an opportunity for education to all, regardless of race, religion, sex, national origin or ethnic background. (Revised, November 2003).

PHILOSOPHY AND PURPOSE
In the early history of Rust College, its first president, the Reverend A.C. McDonald, stated the purpose of Rust College as follows:

"It is our aim to not do hot-house work, seeking to hurry students through a college curriculum, as do many mushroom schools in the South, sending them into the battle of life only to disgrace themselves and bring reproach upon the cause of education at large, but take the by far more difficult and tedious plan of trying to lay well a foundation for a broad, thorough, and practical education, such as shall fit our pupils for long lives of usefulness to themselves, their race, and the church."

President McDonald gave the criterion for testing this purpose: ''By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them,'' which is the motto of Rust College, and a good criterion for its purpose. While the elements of the purpose as originally stated by President McDonald remain in essence, the scope and expression of the purpose have expanded and must be expressed in terms of complexities and demands of education in a more complex and sophisticated society.


PRESIDENTS OF RUST COLLEGE
Reverend A.C. McDonald .................................................................................................................. 1866-1876
Reverend A.W. Hooper, D.D.............................................................................................................. 1876-1885
Reverend Charles E. Libby, D.D........................................................................................................ 1885-1897
Reverend W.W. Foster, Jr. D.D.......................................................................................................... 1897-1909
Reverend James T. Dockings, Ph.D. .................................................................................................. 1909-1915
Reverend George Evans, D.D............................................................................................................. 1915-1920
Professor Matthews S. Davage ........................................................................................................... 1920-1924
Dr. Lee Marcus McCoy, B.A., M.A., Litt.D....................................................................................... 1924-1957
Dr. Earnest A. Smith, A.B., M.A., D.D. ............................................................................................. 1957-1967
Dr. William A. McMillan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., L.L.D. ....................................................................... 1967-1993
Dr. David L. Beckley, B.A, M.Ed., Ph.D. .......................................................................................... 1993-

QUALITY ENHANCEMENT PLAN (QEP) GOALS
(Reference: 2009-2014 Strategic Plan)

A. To identify and modify institutional attitudes and practices that may cause students to feel disengaged from the institution;
B. To increase student engagement with the curriculum, the advising process, and student services during the entire matriculation to graduation;
C. To maintain an environment that will enhance the intellectual life of the campus and foster opportunities for community service that will in turn result in lifelong learning and service.



SIGNIFICANT DATES
1866 Shaw School established in Asbury Methodist Episcopal Church with Dr. A.C. McDonald as the first President.
1867 Erection of the first building (McDonald Hall) on the present campus.
1868 Institution chartered as Shaw University by the State of Mississippi.
1870 The State of Mississippi authorized Shaw College to award degrees May 26.
1878 First two college graduates were Robert Q. Adams and Wesley Thomas.
1892 The name of the institution was changed from Shaw University to Rust University.
1914 The institution placed under the auspices of the Board of Education of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
1915 The name of the institution changed from Rust University to Rust College.
1920 Dr. M.S. Davage became the first African-American President of the institution.
1924 Dr. L. M. McCoy, an alumnus, became Rust's eighth president and served with distinction for 33 years (1924-1957).
1930 Ms. Natalie Doxey started the Rust College A 'Cappella Choir. The Elementary School discontinued.
1940 A major disaster (Rust Hall burned). This five-story building housed administrative offices, the library, dormitories for men and women, dining hall, music department, auditorium, classrooms for college courses, and gymnasium.
1953 The high school department discontinued.
1957 President Dr. Earnest A. Smith, an alumnus, became the 9th president (1957-1967).
1960 Erection of President's Shrine representing nine (9) college presidents.
1965 Completion of Wiff Dormitory, Gross Dormitory and McDonald Science Hall. Football at Rust discontinued. The G. I. Dormitory for male students was torn down to build the Science Building.
1966 Institute for Community Services (ICS) Head start established.
1967 Dr. W.A. McMillan became the tenth president. Served from 1967-1993.
1970 The Leontyne Price Library completed.
1970 Completed Davage-Smith dormitory, which houses 170 male students and E.L. Rust Hall which houses 196 female students.
1970 Rust College accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
1971 New Physical Education Building completed (W. A. McMillan Center).
1974 Modular scheduling program instituted. Doxey Fine Arts Building completed.
1974 Rust College accreditation reaffirmed by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
1981 R.A. and Ruth M. Brown Mass Communication Center housing WURC radio and RC-TV2 television station completed.
1984 Rust College Accreditation reaffirmed by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
1987 WURC, a non-commercial radio station, established on campus.
1991 Emma Elzy Residence Hall completed.
1992 Erection of Post Office/Student Washerette. Ervin ''Magic'' Johnson Sports Arena completed.
1993 ''A New Era: In Quest of Excellence'' began with the eleventh President, Dr. David L. Beckley.
1994 Rust College accreditation reaffirmed by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
1999 John Davis Plant Operations Building completed
2000 David L. Beckley Conference Service Center completed.
2001 James A. Elam Chapel completed.
2004 Rust College accreditation reaffirmed by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
2008 Hamilton Science Center completed
2011 Rust College received Airliewood, an antebellum former slave plantation estate a few blocks from the campus. Built in 1858, Airliewood served as living quarters for General Ulysses Grant during the Civil War.


THE CAMPUS AND THE BUILDINGS
THE CAMPUS is situated on the northern part of the city, facing Rust Avenue, which connects Memphis Street on the west side and North Randolph on the east side. The area of the campus is approximately 126 acres.

FRANCES HATHORNE ALUMNI & PUBLIC RELATIONS CENTER, formerly known as OAKVIEW MANSION (remodeled 1905, 1973 and 1994), is the oldest building on campus built prior to the Civil War and was first remodeled in 1905. Formally the Infirmary and office spaces, was renovated to house female students in 1985. Beginning July 1, 1994, Oakview Mansion houses the offices of Public Relations, Alumni Affairs and the International Alumni Association's President. Included in this facility are two guest bedrooms, a storage area, a conference room and several offices.

*MCCOY BUILDING (1947), a two-story colonial style building, houses the administrative offices. In 1971 an annex was added to the Administration Building.

SHAW HALL (1952), Old Cafeteria renovated in 1990, houses Special Services and the College Health Center. There is also one handicap-equipped apartment located in this building.

THE PRESIDENT'S HOME (1958) renovated in 1993 is an attractive five-bedroom bungalow located on the east side of the campus, currently serving as a guesthouse.

GROSS RESIDENCE HALL (1965) a three-story building that provides housing for 90 freshman male students, with a comfortable lounge, and an apartment for the Residence Hall Director.

*McDONALD SCIENCE HALL (1965) is a two-story air-conditioned brick building which houses physics, chemistry, and biology laboratories; two lecture rooms and several classrooms; and faculty offices. In 1973 the Miller annex to the Science Building was completed.

WIFF RESIDENCE HALL (1965) a three-story building that provides housing for 90 upper class female honor students.

*DAVAGE-SMITH RESIDENCE HALL (1970) a two-story building that houses 274 upper class male students, with a lounge area and an apartment for the Residence Hall Director. In 1976 the Living and Learning Center annex was added to this facility.

LEONTYNE PRICE LIBRARY (1969) is a two-story modern facility located at the center of the campus directly behind the L. M. McCoy Administration Building. It was dedicated on December 4, 1969, in honor of the famous Metropolitan Opera Star, Miss Leontyne Price.

E. L. RUST RESIDENCE HALL (1970) is a two-story brick air-conditioned building that houses 194 freshman female students. The rooms have individual air-heating units, with built-in desks, drawer and closet space.

S. L. GRIFFIN WAREHOUSE & BOOKSTORE (1970) is an air-conditioned building which houses the bookstore, warehouse and print shop. This building was named in memory of Mr. S. L. Griffin, who served for more than 30 years as buildings and grounds supervisor, football coach and athletic director.

DOXEY ALUMNI FINE ART-COMMUNICATION CENTER (1974) is a modern facility with a 600-seat auditorium, ample space for faculty offices, recording studios, music, art and other disciplines in the Division of Humanities. The building is named in honor of Ms. Natalie Doxey and all former students and graduates. The Auditorium is named for Mr. Albert Morehouse of Humboldt, Iowa, who left $260,000 in his Will for the inclusion of a Chapel-Auditorium in this building.

*McMILLAN MULTI-PURPOSE CENTER (1971) (formerly Inter-Disciplinary Education Center, 1971) is a modern air-conditioned building with a 2,500-seat gymnasium/auditorium, indoor swimming pool, faculty offices and classrooms. In 1973, a spacious annex was added containing a snack bar, a recreation area with bowling billiard tables, and other indoor games.

R.A. AND RUTH M. BROWN MASS COMMUNICATION CENTER (1981)
is a two-story brick, fully airconditioned building with banquet facilities; recording, television and radio studios; journalism facilities; three classrooms and faculty offices.

KATHY W. SMITH FACULTY/STAFF APARTMENT COMPLEX (1979) is a twelve-unit apartment complex built for faculty and staff use. This complex was named in memory of Miss Kathy W. Smith who worked in several capacities at Rust College from 1964 until her death in 1997.

EATON HALL (1983) is an air-conditioned frame building that houses single female students with one child. This building was named for the late Mrs. F.N. Eaton, a graduate and a teacher of economics at Rust for more than thirty years.

GRIFFIN RESIDENCE HALL (1985) is an air-conditioned frame building which houses faculty apartments. This building was named for the late Mrs. Carlean T. Griffin, who was a graduate and life-long employee of Rust College.

McCARTY/VARNELL BUSINESS, COMPUTER AND SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTER (1989) is a state-ofthe- art 44,000 square-foot, two-story brick building with classroom space for the divisions of Social Science and Business and the computer laboratories. It also houses the James T. Heard Auditorium.

EMMA ELZY LIVING/LEARNING RESIDENCE HALL was completed in March, 1991, and houses 208 female students. The modern two-story building houses a student lounge and a living/learning center.

L.B.  BRUCE SERVICE CENTER (1992) houses the campus Post Office and Laundromat. The post office has 2000 mailboxes available to students and the Laundromat has 18 washers and 20 dryers.  This building is named for the late L.B. Bruce, who was a graduate and a life-long employee of Rust College. Read Bio.

JOHN H. DAVIS PLANT AND OPERATIONS BUILDING (1999) houses the Area of Operations and Physical Plant. In addition to office space, the building provides space for a shop and specified work areas. This building was named in honor of Mr. John Harry Davis who served as plant director for 27 years (1967-1994).

*DAVID L. BECKLEY CONFERENCE CENTER (2000) is a one-story brick air-conditioned building designed for inter-relationships with the local community such as continuing education, entrepreneurial development, work readiness programs and meetings. The building is located directly across Rust Avenue from the campus. The center was constructed with the assistance of a grant from the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Within the center is the Trojcak Art Collection.

JAMES A. ELAM CHAPEL (2001) is a one-story brick structure with sanctuary seating for 250 people. It was named in honor of donor James Andrew Elam of Dayton, Ohio.

HAMILTON SCIENCE CENTER (2008) is a stately three-story addition to the current McDonald Science Building. The Center brings the latest in technology and research to the students. The building was named in honor of major donors, Dr. & Mrs. Ralph Hamilton, Memphis, TN.

RUST @ AIRLIEWOOD (2011) is an antebellum former slave plantation estate a few blocks from the Rust College campus. Built in 1858, Airliewood served as living quarters for General Ulysses Grant during the Civil War. The property was acquired through the generosity of Kathy and Joe Overstreet and serves as the official residence of the President.

*Named for former Presidents